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International Precision Medicine Conference

April 19-21, 2021 | Orlando, USA

Scopus Indexed Conference
scopus
Holiday Inn Orlando SW Celebration Area, 5711 W. Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway, Kissimmee, FL 34746, USA
Phone : 1 (702) 988 2320
Toll Free: 1800–883-8082
Whatsapp: +1 (540) 709-1879
Email: precision@magnus-event.com
April 19-21, 2021 | Orlando, USA

Grant Morahan

International Precision Medicine Conference- Grant Morahan
Grant Morahan
University of Western Australia, Australia
Title : Predicting personalised risk of disease and disease outcomes: Genetic tests outperform current clinical tests

Abstract:

Over the last decade, thousands of genetic variants that contribute to the risk of developing disease have been identified. While there has been great progress in identifying such variants, their effect on phenotype and the mechanisms by which they contribute to disease remain largely unknown, and most have little clinical utility in predicting disease outcomes. We have developed new methods for analysing genetic data. These allow the production of tests that can identify people at higher disease risk. For example, we can identify people at higher risk of developing melanoma, and predict their chances of survival up to ten years after the diagnosis of melanoma. Genetically-defined high and low risk groups were found in melanoma cases Stages I, II and III, and our genetic tests had better predictive value than histological (Breslow) tests. We also applied the method to identifying people at higher risk of suffering heart attacks. This test also outperformed clinical tests like Framingham Risk Score, and even coronary artery CT angiography. Genetic tests offer a new era in precision medicine whereby better treatments can be developed and offered to high risk subjects earlier in the disease process. Our work has the potential to save lives and great savings for national health budgets.

Over the last decade, thousands of genetic variants that contribute to the risk of developing disease have been identified. While there has been great progress in identifying such variants, their effect on phenotype and the mechanisms by which they contribute to disease remain largely unknown, and most have little clinical utility in predicting disease outcomes. We have developed new methods for analysing genetic data. These allow the production of tests that can identify people at higher disease risk. For example, we can identify people at higher risk of developing melanoma, and predict their chances of survival up to ten years after the diagnosis of melanoma. Genetically-defined high and low risk groups were found in melanoma cases Stages I, II and III, and our genetic tests had better predictive value than histological (Breslow) tests. We also applied the method to identifying people at higher risk of suffering heart attacks. This test also outperformed clinical tests like Framingham Risk Score, and even coronary artery CT angiography. Genetic tests offer a new era in precision medicine whereby better treatments can be developed and offered to high risk subjects earlier in the disease process. Our work has the potential to save lives and great savings for national health budgets.

Biography:

Professor Grant Morahan has a doctorate from the University of Melbourne and worked at Scripps Clinic, USA. In 2005, he was appointed Inaugural Scientific Director of Clinical Sciences at Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Perth. His research included immune tolerance, immunogenetics, and genetics of complex genetic diseases, especially type 1 diabetes(T1D). He has 250 scientific papers, including several in Nature, Science, Lancet, Nature Genetics, PNAS and Diabetes. Research highlights include identifying IL12B as a gene affecting diseases of immune dysregulation including severe asthma and cerebral malaria; inventing the term ‘Systems Genetics and an international collaboration discovering 50 genes causing T1D.

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